Your Retirement Handbook

Are you ready for retirement? Request your FREE copy of this valuable handbook.

This powerful eGuide contains detailed, easy-to-read, easy-to-reference information designed to help you work toward a smooth and confident retirement transition.

Save & Invest
  If you are under 30, you have likely heard that now is the ideal time to save and invest. You know that the power of compound interest is on your side; you recognize the potential advantages of an early start. There is only one problem: you do not earn enough money to invest. You
529 Plan
    When President Trump signed the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act into law late in 2017, new possibilities emerged for the tax-advantaged investment vehicles known as 529 college savings plans. Funds from these accounts may now be used to pay for qualified elementary and secondary school expenses under federal law.1 Unfortunately, some state laws
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Credit Score
  We all know the value of a good credit score. We all try to maintain one. Sometimes, though, life throws us a financial curve and that score declines. What steps can we take to repair it? Reduce your credit utilization ratio (CUR). CUR is credit industry jargon, an arcane way of referring to how
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Filial Responsibility laws
  Imagine your parents outliving their money. A terrible thought, right? Should this occur, there will be one of two outcomes. Either your parents will move in with you (or someone else), or your parents will become indigent. Hopefully, your parents have saved, invested, and managed their money well enough to avoid such a plight,
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college loans
  Is student loan debt weighing on the economy? Probably. Total student loan debt in America is now around $1.5 trillion, having tripled since 2008. The average indebted college graduate leaves campus owing nearly $40,000, and the mean monthly student loan payment for borrowers aged 30 and younger is about $350.1,2 The latest Federal Reserve
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Procrastinating
  First, look at your expenses and your debt. Review your core living expenses (such as a mortgage payment, car payment, etc.). Can any core expenses be reduced? Investing aside, you position yourself to gain ground financially when income rises, debt shrinks, and expenses decrease or stabilize. Maybe you should pay your debt first, maybe
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